Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression
Displaying 1 - 20 of 51
63rd and Troost Shopping Center

This picture was taken looking southwest at the intersection of Troost Avenue and 63rd Street. The pictured shopping center opened in October 1927.

Date: 
October 1927

J. C. Nichols School, located at 69th and Oak Streets, now known as Académie Lafayette. This vantage point faces northeast at the intersection of Oak Street and 69th Terrace.

Date: 
1927

Close up exterior view of the Oak Street entrance to the J. C. Nichols School, now known as Académie Lafayette. This building is located at the southeastern corner of Oak Street and 69th Street.

Date: 
1927

The restored residence of the missionary at the Shawnee Indian Mission with a child sitting out front. This building is located at the southeastern corner of 52nd Street and Porter Road (now 53rd Street and Mission Road). This vantage point faces south-southeast on present day 53rd Street from just east of Mission Road.

Date: 
1927

The restored residence of the missionary at the Shawnee Indian Mission. This building is located at the southeastern corner of 52nd Street and Porter Road (now 53rd Street and Mission Road). This vantage point faces southeast on present day 53rd Street from just east of mission Road.

Date: 
1927

The restored dormitory building of the Shawnee Indian Mission. This building is located at the northeastern corner of 52nd Street and Porter Road (now 53rd Street and Mission Road). This vantage point faces north on present day 53rd Street from just east of Mission Road.

Date: 
1927

This picture of the Country Club Plaza Balcony Building was taken looking west at the intersection of 47th Street and Wornall Road.

Date: 
1927

Letter from James A. Reed to Tom Pendergast asking for assistance for Samuel M. Cromwell.

Date: 
October 29th 1927

Letter from James A. Reed to A. W. Thurman discussing a meeting with Senator Francis Wilson who was planning to run for governor.

Date: 
November 28th 1927

Jackson County Judge Harry S. Truman is signing county checks with a multiple machine.

Date: 
September 24th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman aboard the National Limited (Baltimore & Ohio Railroad) to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his entitlements during the trip: "Davis suggests that I inform you of all the tricks we are entitled to on this Limited whether we use them or not; such as maid, hairdresser, barber shop & bath, secretary, valet, tailor etc. etc. ad infinitum."

Date: 
February 11th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel to Fort Riley and on his new entitlements there as a lieutenant colonel.

Date: 
July 10th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his increased influence at Fort Riley, remarking that, "I'm having a wonderful time doing a little political maneuvering. Also evening up some scores. The colonel listens to what I say and when I make suggestions about certain regular army officers he immediately flies into them... You see politics is never absent when I'm around."

Date: 
July 13th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and upcoming plans at Fort Riley. He then comments on local Kansas City politics: "I see the said court is functioning. The Star said they had ordered Koehler to pave Fairmount Ave. Had a letter from Vrooman saying the court was not taking any chances on anything but holding all doubtful matters for my return."

Date: 
July 15th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Fort Riley, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and complains about the post office system for not receiving a letter, saying that, "It's like everything else under this Republican Gov't I guess just a lack of efficiency." Truman also mentions Kansas City director of public works Matthew S. Murray.

Date: 
July 16th 1927

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Council Grove, Kansas to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travels and informs her of the how well he is being treated, saying that, "You should be along. I haven't spent a nickle [sic] and I can't. They won't let me[.] even the phone call was free."

Date: 
September 30th 1927

Downtown Kansas City as shown from an aerial view before the 1928 Republican National Convention begins on June 12 at Convention Hall. This elevated vantage point faces northeast and shows the Convention Hall in the right-center foreground. The Missouri River is pictured in the far right background.

Date: 
December 12th 1927

Exterior of the Convention Hall in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This elevated vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street.

Date: 
December 11th 1927

Interior of the Convention Hall in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935.

Date: 
December 11th 1927

1927 photograph of the Lincoln Theatre exterior, with staff posed in front. Advertisements for "The Strange Case of Captain Ramper" are displayed on the front of the theatre. The Lincoln Theatre was once located at the northwest corner of 18th Street and Lydia Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri. Source: Lawrence Denton.

Date: 
1927

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