Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

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The Official Program of the First International 300-Mile Speed Classic: Grand Opening of the Kansas City Speedway on September 17, 1922, a dedication by the American Legion of Missouri and Kansas. The program includes local advertisements, a schedule of events, articles on racetrack facilities, and bios of the racers. This includes the headshot and bio of Roscoe Sarles, who died during the race on opening day. The Kansas City Speedway was a wooden racetrack in operation from 1922-1924 near the present-day Bannister Federal Complex at Bannister Road and Troost Avenue.

Date: 
September 1922

A panorama of the Kansas City Speedway, a wooden racetrack in operation from 1922-1924 near the present-day Bannister Federal Complex at Bannister Road and Troost Avenue. The entrance to the speedway was located at 91st Street and Holmes Road. The speedway cost $500,000 in 1922 and could host 60,000 people. After two years, it had to be closed as holes in the wooden racetrack became too large to safely race on.

Date: 
July 4th 1923

The cover of the September 1920 program for the Shubert Theatre in Kansas City, Missouri. It includes an advertisement for the Gregory Motor Company on the bottom of the page.

Date: 
September 1920

The cover, back, and excerpts of a program for the Isis Theatre at 31st Street and Troost Avenue in Kansas City, Missouri. The back includes an advertisement for Earll & Gehring's Original Doughnut Shops. Also included is an advertisement for the Isis Cafeteria featuring the Carleton-Coons-Sanders Novelty Orchestra.

A special bulletin by William M. Campbell, Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, providing his opinion on Alfred Emanuel "Al" Smith, the 1928 Democratic U.S. presidential candidate. Campbell opposes Smith on the grounds that Smith is an Irish, Catholic, and supports the repeal of Prohibition. Campbell proclaims, "Out of this new second generation of cults, with their gay philosophy and their continental Sabbaths, with their belief in authority for conduct in the church, rather than in the state, come Smith and his kind."

Date: 
November 1st 1928

Snapshot of Louise Byers with friends from Kansas City School of Law (Tiera Farrow, Anna Campbell, and Sue Mandell included), ca. 1919. The back of the photograph includes the following text: "Brother, These are the girls who were out when the Juniors had their party at our house. Susan Mandell, Glady Asel, Anna Mae Campbell, Mrs. Rogers, Emma Chaquette, Miss Farrow, Elsie Asel, Esther Johnson, Clara Austin, & me [Louise Byers] at the bottom." Byers and Farrow were co-founders of the Women's Bar Association of Kansas City.

Date: 
1919

Reunion of Central High School graduating class of 1878 with their teacher, Mary Harmon Weeks, held at Newbern Hotel in 1928. Pictured from left to right: Sam Daniels, Kattie Proctor, Robert Shoan, Mary Harmon [Weeks], Lindley Coates, William Dewey, Lulu Butterfield, and John Gilday. Weeks was a leader in the public kindergarten movement and started the first Parent Teacher Association in Missouri. She was also the first president of the Anthenaeum, the oldest active Kansas City women's club, founded in 1894.

Date: 
1928

Mary Tiera Farrow, more commonly known as Tiera Farrow, photographed in the uniform of the National League of Women’s Services and standing next to an ambulance, ca. 1918. Farrow was one of the few women in the United States who successfully practiced law in the early 1900s despite the discrimination that women faced in the legal field and society more generally. After having been denied the professional benefits of joining any existing bar association, Farrow led a group of 20 women in establishing their own bar in Kansas City.

Date: 
1918

Exterior of the Convention Hall that housed the 1928 National Republican Convention in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This elevated vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street.

Date: 
June 11th 1928

Exterior of the Convention Hall that housed the 1928 National Republican Convention in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street. The caption reads, "Scene of the Republican national convention at Kansas City. A huge spread eagle design on a sunburst jewel was suspended before Convention hall just before the opening of the convention.

Date: 
June 1928

Downtown Kansas City as shown from an aerial view before the 1928 Republican National Convention begins on June 12 at Convention Hall. This elevated vantage point faces northeast and shows the Convention Hall in the right-center foreground. The Missouri River is pictured in the far right background.

Date: 
December 12th 1927

Wide shot of Kansas City Massacre aftermath. This event, also known as the Union Station Massacre, saw the deaths of Frank Nash, an Oklahoma train and bank robber; William J. Grooms, a Kansas City police officer; Frank E. Hermanson, another Kansas City police officer; Raymond J. Caffrey, an FBI specialist; and Otto Reed, the chief of police for McAlester, Oklahoma. Outlaws Vernon Miller, Charles (Pretty Boy) Floyd, and Adam Richetti were attempting to free Frank Nash from law enforcement custody.

Date: 
June 17th 1933

The intersection of Main Street and 12th Street decorated with patriotic banners and flags for the 1928 Republican National Convention at Convention Hall in Kansas City, Missouri. This elevated vantage point faces south on Main Street towards the intersection of 12th and Main from just south of 11th Street. Pictured are the Kresge Building (left), The Jones Store Company (center), and Liberty Theater (right).

Date: 
June 11th 1928

Dust Bowl period photograph of Union Station during a dust storm on March 20, 1935. This vantage point faces west towards Union Station from just east of Main Street. The caption reads, "Kansas City, March 20.-This is the way the Union station really appeared Wednesday afternoon as sand and earth from Kansas and other states fogged the air in a terrific dust storm. Visibility was clouded to an altitude of 15,000 feet."

Date: 
March 20th 1935

Dust Bowl period photograph of two pedestrians in Kansas City during a dust storm at noon on March 21, 1935. These dust storms caused an estimated one billion dollars in damages.

Date: 
March 21st 1935

Dust Bowl period photograph of school children in Kansas City during a dust storm on March 22, 1935. The caption reads, "Kansas City, March 22.-Handkerchiefs over faces were recommended by school principals Friday wherever recurrence of the middle west dust storms appeared probable. Pupils thus equipped are shown leaving a grade school when the storm was at its height."

Date: 
March 22nd 1935
Grand Avenue During a Dust Storm

Dust Bowl period photograph of Grand Avenue from 10th Street in Kansas City during a dust storm at noon on March 21, 1935. This vantage point faces south-southwest on Grand Avenue (now Grand Boulevard) from just south of 10th Street. W. W. Kimball Pianos is pictured to the left at 1009 Grand Avenue.

Date: 
March 21st 1935

Exterior of the Convention Hall that housed the 1928 National Republican Convention in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street.

Date: 
June 7th 1928

Exterior of the Convention Hall in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935. This elevated vantage point faces northeast on Central Street, just south of 13th Street.

Date: 
December 11th 1927

Interior of the Convention Hall in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. This hall was once located on the north side of 13th Street between Wyandotte Street and Central Street. It was razed after the completion of the Municipal Auditorium in 1935.

Date: 
December 11th 1927

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