Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression
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Senator Harry S. Truman, Thomas J. Pendergast, James P. Aylward, James Farley, N. G. Robertson, and David Fitzgerald at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Date: 
June 24th 1936

Jackson County Judges Harry S. Truman, William O. Beeman, and Eugene I. "Buck" Purcell took the oath of office on January 6, 1931. L-R: Jackson County Clerk Eddie Becker, Eastern district Judge Eugene Purcell, Presiding Judge Harry S. Truman, Western district Judge William O. Beeman, and Jackson County Deputy Sherriff Tiny Johnson.

Date: 
January 6th 1931

Jackson County Judge Harry S. Truman is signing county checks with a multiple machine.

Date: 
September 24th 1927

This is a photograph of a newspaper advertisement for Harry S. Truman's 1924 campaign for Eastern District Jackson County Court Judge. The photo ran in the Independence Examiner.

Date: 
October 31st 1924

Harry S. Truman and the 129th Field Artillery in front of the Muehlebach Hotel during the November 1921 Armistice parade in Kansas City, MO. Truman is in uniform, on the far side of the street, behind the man in the suit. This photograph was taken looking southeast on 12th Street just west of Baltimore Avenue.

Date: 
November 1921

Mr. James Pendergast (third from left) is photographed at President Harry S. Truman's inaugural gala at the National Guard Armory in Washington, D.C. Pendergast's wife, Kathleen (fourth from left), and daughter, Mary Ellen Pendergast (unknown position), are also present along with two unidentified women.

Date: 
January 19th 1949

President Harry S. Truman (right) with James Pendergast, evidently taken in Independence, Missouri, upon Truman's arrival from Washington, D.C. This photo has been badly retouched and contains crop marks. Donor: John Boos.

Date: 
August 3rd 1946

Miss May Lowe seated in the campaign "sound" car for Harry S. Truman's 1934 senatorial campaign. From an album of campaign pictures from October 1 to November 3, 1934, presented to Senator Harry S. Truman by Urso W. George and Bentley Morrow. This album was from the Truman home.

Date: 
October 1934

Harry S. Truman is being sworn in as a judge of the county court of Jackson County, Missouri. Left to Right: Edward Becker, County Clerk; Eugene Purcell, Judge of Eastern District; Harry Truman, Presiding Judge; W. O. Beeman, Judge of Western District. From: Petey Childers.

Date: 
January 6th 1931

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman shows his commitment to the state and his ideals: "I went into the R.R. business again today and I think got some more real information. I have a notion it didn't please Mr. [William T.] Kemper [Sr.] very much. But I can't help it. I'm not working for him. I'm working for Missouri."

Date: 
November 3rd 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then shows his political persistence: "If I quit this thing now, they'll say that Kemper and the Boss pulled me off, and I'm going to go through with it if I don't get home at all."

Date: 
November 9th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides the latest information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "I missed a call from [Joseph B.] Shannon... Jim P. [Pendergast] said he hoped I'd keep him here but I'm glad he's going home. He says [Lloyd C.] Stark will run against [Bennett C.] Clark and not against me."

Date: 
November 22nd 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides some candid information concerning Kansas City and Missouri politics: "…[Bennett C.] Clark has definitely lined up with the Boss [Tom Pendergast] you see. He and Maurice Milligan almost came to blows the last time they met and now the Pres and [Lloyd C.] Stark are thinking of running him for Senator against Clark."

Date: 
November 28th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts the dinner he had with railroad lobbyist Jim Nugent: "In fact I think everyone has a right to be heard if you expect to get all the facts. Of course it is the job of some people to befog the issue and cover up the facts. I don't put Jim in that class."

Date: 
December 6th 1937

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and then provides information on the Missouri public's current opinion of Governor Lloyd C. Stark: "There are a number of letters from all over the state giving the governor a real dressing down. One calls him Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-for T.J.P. to get elected and against him to get headlines."

Date: 
July 5th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his travel and speaks about Kansas City Bar Association President Henry Depping: "Depping is a Republican and one of the inner circle in K.C. He told me he'd try to get enough Republican candidates into the Senatorial race so they wouldn't vote in my primary."

Date: 
July 22nd 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides his opinion on Maurice M. Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark: "I don't want Milligan to run unless he and Stark run together. That would be too good."

Date: 
July 24th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then provides details on Clark and Truman's political maneuvering: "Clark said he was to see Tuck [Jacob] Milligan yesterday and that he'd rub a little salt on Stark. He thinks maybe we can get 'em all in the race."

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman informs Bess of his upcoming plans and comments on the newspapers' opinion of Lloyd C. Stark': "The K.C. Star, the Post-Dispatch, and the Star-Times in St. Louis are giving Mr. Stark dig after dig. It looks as if their hero has feet of clay (or rotten apples)."

Date: 
August 1st 1939

Letter from Harry S. Truman in Washington D.C. to his wife Bess in Independence, Missouri. In this letter, Truman updates Bess on his day and then recounts one man's opinion of the Missouri political climate: "Had a letter from J. John Gillis this morning in which he said the Dems in Mo couldn't win unless Stark was nominated for V.P. He's a crazy Republican lawyer in K.C."

Date: 
August 6th 1939

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