Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression
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Excerpts of a scrapbook created by the American Legion Wayne Miner Post No. 149, one of the oldest African American posts in the nation. This scrapbook spans the 1930's through the 1950's and includes newspaper clippings documenting their civic activities. Also included are correspondence to the relatives of U.S. Army Private Wayne Miner, believed to be one of the last American soldiers to die in World War I. Various other ephemera include bulletins, programs, and correspondence between members.

A reprint of an article clipped from defunct Kansas City newspaper, The Kansas City American. This clipping documents the shift in local and national politics in which black voters begin to support Democratic candidates. Felix H. Payne and the Central United Democratic Committee provides an endorsement for Judge James V. Billings for Judge of the Supreme Court, urging readers to "join us August 2, [1938,] primary election day, to go to the polls in your community..."

Date: 
1938

Front page to the February 15, 1939 issue of Justice, a magazine published by the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union in Jersey City, New Jersey. Pictured are three undergarment workers employed at the Hoosick Falls (NY) Undergarment Company and a cartoon of Abraham Lincoln.

Date: 
February 15th 1939

Full-page advertisement by International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) in the June 8, 1937 issue of the Kansas City Journal-Post. The ILGWU responds to criticism directed towards the union by the Kansas City Citizens' Protective Council, Inc. in a May 13, 1937 advertisement. The ILGWU also includes an excerpt of a speech made by Frank Prins at garment industry dinner in Kansas City on March 6, 1937.

Date: 
June 8th 1937

Letter and newspaper clipping sent by J. R. Proctor to Governor Stark concerning the upcoming Senatorial race.

Date: 
December 3rd 1939

Letter that describe retaliation against a Kansas City employee who had collaborated with reformers, and including a St. Louis Star-Times clipping advocating the ouster of Matthew S. Murray as the state WPA director.

Date: 
June 21st 1939

Political cartoon entitled "Equal Justice Under Tom's Law," depicting Tom Pendergast with the Missouri Supreme Court in his pocket.

Date: 
1938

St. Louis Star-Times article about the 1936 investigation into election fraud, including a sketch of Pendergast by Thomas Hart Benton. The article reports Pendergast "said today that he had been investigated so often that 'one more doesn't bother me much.'" He argued that he had no idea of any election fraud.

Date: 
December 15th 1936

Unsigned letter to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, including a clipping from the Kansas City Times, regarding the demand to prosecute violations of election laws. The letter also mentions that Prosecutor Tom Graves intends to marry the widow of John Lazia.

Date: 
June 16th 1937

Letter signed "A disgusted Democrat" to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, including a newspaper clipping about Missouri state senators Joseph H. Brogan, Mike Kinney, and M. E. Casey, and a request to take a strong stand against them if they don't vote in favor of laws protecting fair elections.

Date: 
May 7th 1937

Letter from J. R. Smith to Governor Lloyd C. Stark, including a St. Joseph News-Press newspaper clipping about an Al Capone associate marveling at Kansas City vice. The article is titled "WIDE OPEN AND VULGAR." Smith also requests that Stark help retain Henry Dillingham as U.S. Marshall, and writes that Harry Truman "is not fit to represent a good dog kennel."

Clipping from the Sunday Washington Star by O. K. Armstrong describing the Pendergast machine and efforts to take them down ahead of a March 1938 election.

Date: 
March 13th 1938

Booneville Daily News editorial expressing concern that voter fraud will be a problem in the upcoming gubernatorial election. The editorial reports that in a second ward precinct, "Kansas City Star reporters investigating registration irregularities yesterday could not find or account for 131 names at addresses shown on the precinct verification list to be the homes of 236 voters."

Article from the New York World-Telegram on Tom Pendergast, in which the Kansas City boss offers his opinions on political machines, strong bosses and local politics. He and Mayor Bryce Smith also discuss Pendergast's Ready Mixed Concrete Company.

Date: 
July 12th 1935

Letter from Lloyd Stark to Arthur Foster thanking him for sending the attached newspaper clipping about William Hirth, Stark's opponent in the race for governor.

Date: 
June 4th 1936

Four page article subtitled "An Appeal to the Farm men and Women of Missouri," outlining William Hirth's focus on defeating the Pendergast political machine. Hirth was a democratic candidate for Missouri Governor, ultimately defeated by Lloyd Stark.

Date: 
July 4th 1936

Newspaper article reporting on a speech given by Frederick E. Whitten in which he rails against the corruption of the Pendergast organization.

Date: 
July 27th 1939

Anonymous letter from "A Citizen" complaining about the Pendergast influence in Kansas City, and about their economic circumstances in a larger sense. A newspaper clipping from the Livermore (Iowa) Gazette is included.

Letter to Governor Lloyd Stark complaining about the prevalence of illegal gambling and slot machines in the city.

Date: 
June 29th 1937

Clipping and brief note encouraging Gov. Stark to crack down on illegal gambling and slot machines in Kansas City. The clipping quotes city manager Henry McElroy as saying he'll feed a Stark Brothers' Nursery Golden Delicious apple to his dog.

Date: 
May 16th 1938

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