Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression
Displaying 1 - 15 of 15

Political advertisement in the form of a letter to Missouri voters which characterizes Lloyd Stark as a corrupt affiliate of the Pendergast machine.

Date: 
August 3rd 1936

Political publication in the form of a "sample ballot" indicating that a vote for Jesse Barrett was a vote against Pendergast influence in Missouri.

Date: 
1936

Campaign letter, political advertisement and newspaper clipping in support of Harry S. Truman senatorial campaign.

Date: 
July 11th 1934

Advertisement for Truman & Jacobson Haberdashers at 104 W. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The tongue-in-cheek message describes the mutual benefit between consumer and company by patronizing the haberdashery.

An advertisement by Music Corporation of America (MCA) for Coon-Sanders Original Nighthawks Orchestra showing the ensemble seated and playing. Source: John Coon.

Advertisement for Imperial Brewing Co., no date. The advertisement reads, "A. F. Stoeger, Geo. Schraubstadter, Imperial Brewing Co., Brewers of High Grade Kansas City Lager Beer. Patronize and Encourage Home Industry. There is no better beer brewed anywhere-Don't contribute to the $2,000,000 annually sent out of Kansas City for bottled beers. This is an exact fac-simile of Missouri's Best Bottled Beer for sale at all independent bars and cafés." Imperial Brewing Co. was sold in 1919 to Rodney Milling Co.. Source: Jack Ralston.

Promotional card for Jay McShann and His Decca Recording Orchestra, no date. The card also promotes "Confessin' the Blues" featuring blues singer Walter Brown. A small portrait of Jay McShann is included in the upper right corner of the card. Source: Gene Ramey.

Circa 1938 photograph of Tommy Douglas and his orchestra posed in front of their tour bus. The back of the photograph is an advertisement for the band that reads: "'Howdy' Folks, Tommy Douglas and his Band, The finest and fastest Colored Band on the road, Showmen, Vocalists, Musicians - A Real Entertaining Attraction. Remarks:- For Dates :- Write, Park Region Orchestra Service, Battle Lake, Minnesota. Tommy Douglas And His Band Will be tootin' near you soon. You Will Enjoy Them."

Political attack advertisement that documents Kansas City Star owner August F. Seested's political exploits for personal gain in local real estate. This document was produced to discourage Kansas Citians from voting for Kansas City Police Commissioner Matthew Foster, the Republican candidate for mayor.

Date: 
March 26th 1922

Advertisement for the re-election of Forest W. Hanna as Prosecutor of Jackson County, Missouri. The document provides crime statistics and figures on funds generated during his time as prosecutor.

Date: 
1926

Advertisement for the re-election of Ewing C. Bland as Judge of the Kansas City Court of Appeals, Jackson County, Missouri. The document states that Bland has bi-partisan support from over 1,000 members of the bar.

Date: 
1928

Advertisement in the Kansas City Times for the American Beauty Macaroni Products featuring Enid J. Kemper (wife of R. Crosby Kemper, Sr.) with her children Sarah Ann (Sally), R. Crosby, Jr., Jan Claire Kemper (left to right). The caption states, "Healthy and Good Looking are the Three Children of Mrs. Crosby Kemper and They All Like Macaroni!"

Date: 
January 23rd 1929

Clipping from the Independence Examiner on February 18, 1932 that advertises Kansas City lawyer Charles M. Howell as candidate for the U.S. Senate. The advertisement provides his qualifications, platform, party service, and availability.

Date: 
February 18th 1932

Advertisement stating that the "Your vote to re-nominate Ernest S. Gantt, Democratic Candidate for Judge of the Supreme Court, will be personally appreciated by The Pendergast Organization." The card was produced by the Eighth Ward Democratic Club, Inc. for the primary election on Tuesday, August 4th, 1936. No signature is included on the blank for Precinct Captain.

Date: 
1936

Advertisement for the Transcontinental & Western Air coast to coast route called "The Lindbergh Line". The route took 48 hours to get from New York City to Los Angeles and used railroads at night and air travel by day.