Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Kansas City Museum / Union Station, Kansas City, Missouri

Displaying 1 - 12 of 165
Object Type: 
Sheet Music

Cover to Electric Park Rag, a rag time two step by Jean Ledies and arranged by Rocco Venuto. Featured by Lenge's Military Band and published by Lenge & Venuto, 1320 South Paseo Place, Kansas City, Missouri. Two photos of Electric Park and a portrait of Lenge are shown. Source: Inst. Studies in American Music/UMKC.

Object Type: 
Photographs

A 1940's photograph of Kansas City's Negro Municipal Band with Dan Blackburn directing. Source: Kansas City Museum Association.

Object Type: 
Posters

Advertisement for Beta Alpha Tau's '3 Band' Mid-Winter Stagger, featuring Phil Baxter's El Torreon Band, Missouri Quad, and the Egyptian Serenaders, admission: $1.25. The event took place at the El Torreon Ball Room from 9pm-1am on December 30th, year unknown. The El Torreon Ballroom was located at the southeast corner of 31st Street and Gillham Road (now Gillham Plaza). Source: Cliff Haliburton.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Bennie Moten's Victor Recording Artists posed around piano taken by Bert Photo Studio, Kansas City, Missouri, ca. 1926. Source: Charles Goodwin.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Circa 1938 photograph of a men marching west in the Black Elks parade at 18th Street and The Paseo. The Street Hotel, Country Club Beer, Elnora's Cafe, and Crown Drug Co. are pictured in background. Source: Black Economic Union.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Down Beat photo with caption, "That McShann Rhythm Section!", ca. 1941. The caption reads, "New York - Here they are, beating it out at the Savoy in Harlem. Jay McShann (at the piano) and his rhythm section include Leonard Enois, guitar; Eugene (Pops) Ramey, bass, and Gus Johnson, drums. Playing the Savoy last month, McShann and his barrelhouse Kansas City crew reportedly "carved" Lucky Millinder's band right off the bandstand. The McShann's Confessin' the Blues is the biggest-selling Decca sepia series discing in history.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Thamon Hayes’ Rockets on stage at Fairyland Park, ca. 1930. Fairyland Park was located at the southeast corner of Prospect Avenue and 75th Street. Pictured from left: Harlan Leonard, alto sax; Vic Dickenson, trombone; Herman Walder, alto sax & clarinet; Hayes, trombone; Woody Walder, tenor sax & clarinet; Richard Smith, trumpet; Booker Washington, trumpet; Ed Lewis, trumpet; Charles "Crook" Goodwin, banjo & vocals; Samuel "Baby" Lovett, drums; Vernon Page, bass & tuba; Jesse Stone, piano, arranger & conductor. Source: Claude Williams.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Full length group photograph of three of the Blue Devils, taken by Bert Studios, Kansas City, (left to right): Ernie Williams, George Hudson, Lester Young, ca. 1932. Source: Jimmy Jewel.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Portrait of John B. Gage, Mayor of Kansas City MO from 1940-1946. Source: Kansas City Museum (George Fuller Green Collection).

Object Type: 
Drawings

Editorial cartoon by S. J. Ray entitled "Somehow I Don't Feel Too Hopeful", no date. The drawing shows depictions of "ghost votes" and "protected crime" looking at a depiction of "election and police board appointments". Source: Vivian Fredericks.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Reunion of Central High School graduating class of 1878 with their teacher, Mary Harmon Weeks, held at Newbern Hotel in 1928. Pictured from left to right: Sam Daniels, Kattie Proctor, Robert Shoan, Mary Harmon [Weeks], Lindley Coates, William Dewey, Lulu Butterfield, and John Gilday. Weeks was a leader in the public kindergarten movement and started the first Parent Teacher Association in Missouri. She was also the first president of the Anthenaeum, the oldest active Kansas City women's club, founded in 1894.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Wide shot of Kansas City Massacre aftermath. This event, also known as the Union Station Massacre, saw the deaths of Frank Nash, an Oklahoma train and bank robber; William J. Grooms, a Kansas City police officer; Frank E. Hermanson, another Kansas City police officer; Raymond J. Caffrey, an FBI specialist; and Otto Reed, the chief of police for McAlester, Oklahoma. Outlaws Vernon Miller, Charles (Pretty Boy) Floyd, and Adam Richetti were attempting to free Frank Nash from law enforcement custody.

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