Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

Displaying 1 - 12 of 364
Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry Easley to Matthew S. Murray in which Easley informs Murray that men in Jasper County, MO are continually visiting him to seek employment with the Works Progress Administration, even though Easley is no longer Deputy State Administrator of the W.P.A.. He then updates Murray on public sentiment in Southwestern Missouri towards the Kansas City Organization.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to the Kansas City Star Editorial Editor in which Burrus responds to an article entitled, "Truman Servant of Pendergast". Burrus believes statements in the article to be untrue and addresses allegations of voter fraud in connection with Harry S. Truman. He also addresses Truman's relationship with Thomas J. Pendergast.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from J. W. Thompson to Governor Lloyd C. Stark concerning social security pensions and Thompson's view of Missouri politicians. He admits he does not like Bennett C. Clark, but as an anti-Pendergast voter, Thompson believes "Clark is better than Truman at his best."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman states that McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, should soon be re-appointed at the Federal Housing Administration. Truman then expresses his sorrow for the death of James A. Shannon, a Kansas City lawyer who passed away on May 16, 1936.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to Jack Alexander, a St. Louis Post Dispatch writer who had written an article critizing Senator Harry S. Truman entitled "Missouri Dark Mule". Burrus responds to accusations that Truman is a Pendergast "yes-man" and that he won because of voter fraud.

Object Type: 
Maps

Map printed in The Missouri Democrat on June 25, 1926, showing the latest official district, ward, and precinct lines for Kansas City, MO as rearranged under a recent charter. Included with the map is the voting booth location for each precinct. The Missouri Democrat was a Kansas City newspaper that began in 1925 under the control of the Pendergast Machine.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry S. Truman to Thomas McGee in which Truman confirms receipt of a picture of Thomas J. Pendergast that McGee had sent him. Truman also expresses his desire for McGee and his associates to visit him in Washington, D.C..

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee informs Truman that McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, was let go from his job at the Federal Housing Administration. He reminds Truman that James P. Aylward and James M. Pendergast had recommended Lillis for an appointment by Truman, and that Lillis was his only relative with a political appointment. McGee also reminds Truman of Thomas J. Pendergast's upcoming travel in which Truman will meet with him.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter to Sam M. Wear from the Aladdin Hotel commenting on Harry S. Truman: "If some one don't stop him, it looks like he will back in Independence looking for a job. Don't you think so?"

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Granville A. Richart to Sam M. Wear in which Richart thanks Wear for Wear's letter of congratulations regarding Richart's nomination. He comments that, "my candidacy was opposed by the political prostitutes, gamblers, the city administration and the Kansas City Star."

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Statement likely made for public release concerning the upcoming election of Kansas City Prosecuting Attorney. The unknown author (possibly Rufus B. Burrus) favors Democrat Michael O'Hern over Republican Chet Keyes and addresses the hypocrisy of the Kansas City Republican Party's argument against voting for O'Hern. The author points out that O'Hern's opponents do not question his character or ability and only dislike him because of the corrupt actions of other Kansas City Democrats.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Kansas City attorney Thomas Phillips to Thomas L. Evans, President of Crown Drug Company. Phillips writes in support of Dick Shanahan for a political appointment. He begins his recommendation mentioning that Shanahan has received an endorsement from James M. Pendergast.

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