Kansas City in the Jazz Age & Great Depression

Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

Displaying 1 - 12 of 364
Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee thanks Truman for giving an appointment to Norman Bowes, saying that it will likely increase support in the Stockyards. McGee acknowledges Truman's receipt of a picture of Thomas J. Pendergast that he sent to Truman. He then updates Truman on a meeting Pendergast calls for that morning.

Object Type: 
Photographs

Collection of portrait photographs of the officers and directors of the Community Savings and Loan Association of Missouri. Pictured are Homer L. Rogers, Robert W. Barr, Lou E. Holland, M. T. Colgan, V. N. Adamson, F. E. Garman, H. H. Halvorson, Harry S. Truman, Arthur S. Metzger, Spencer Salisbury, James H. Clinton, Joseph Cartella, C. C. Daniel, Vera Holland Henthorn, and R. F. Crawford.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Harry Easley to Harry S. Truman in which Easley urges Truman not to give Fred Black, Jr. a political appointment. Easley notes that Black "tells me that Jim Pendergast and Shannon Douglass are going to insist that you help him get this appointment."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Fred Canfil to Harry S. Truman in which Canfil presents a way to sway the vote of the WPA workers for the upcoming primary election by speaking critically of Lloyd C. Stark.

Object Type: 
Essays

Essay documenting the role Ralph E. Truman and Olive L. Truman played in the 1934 U.S. Senatorial campaign in Missouri. Olive details how her and her husband helped Jacob L. Milligan with his campaign before learning that Ralph's cousin Harry S. Truman would enter as well. The two had committed themselves to the Milligan campaign and could not aid Harry. Olive also details tactics used by the Pendergast Organization during this campaign.

Object Type: 
Essays

Essay documenting the relationship between the author's father Alex Sachs and Harry S. Truman. The author addresses their first meeting, Pendergast Machine involvement, and immigration of family members from Germany to the United States. Howard Sachs also includes details of their relationship post-World War II.

Object Type: 
Pamphlets

Pamphlet is support of Maurice M. Milligan for U.S. Senator of Missouri. Milligan ran in opposition to current Senator Harry S. Truman and lost the primary because the anti-Pendergast vote was split between Milligan and Lloyd C. Stark.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Rufus B. Burrus to Hopkins B. Shain congratulating Shain on his nomination for Judge of the Kansas City Court of Appeals. Burrus recalls the moment when Shain announced Pendergast's endorsement of Shain's campaign, saying, "At that time I told you it was the same as substantially securing the nomination."

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Sam M. Wear to James P. Aylward in which Wear requests more money to use during the final days of 1938 Congressional Election.

Object Type: 
Correspondence

Letter from Thomas McGee to Harry S. Truman in which McGee expresses his appreciation in Truman's interest to re-appoint McGee's son-in-law, John Lillis, at the Federal Housing Administation. McGee also comments on Casimir Welch's funeral.

Object Type: 
Cartoons (Commentary)

Political cartoon criticizing Casimir Welch for his corrupt practices. The drawing depicts Cas receiving with his right hand money from cement graft, water meters, lime and coal, policy wheels, cafe and corn whisky, gambling dens at 1228 Oak St. and 15th & Virginia, and "Judicial" decisions, all while holding a classic weight balance (symbol of justice) with his left hand. The background includes a bust of Lady Justice blushing. The caption reads, "Left Handed Justice as Dealt Out by Casimir John Joseph Welsh."

Object Type: 
Miscellaneous Documents

Statement likely made for public release concerning the upcoming election of Kansas City Prosecuting Attorney. The unknown author (possibly Rufus B. Burrus) favors Democrat Michael O'Hern over Republican Chet Keyes and addresses the hypocrisy of the Kansas City Republican Party's argument against voting for O'Hern. The author points out that O'Hern's opponents do not question his character or ability and only dislike him because of the corrupt actions of other Kansas City Democrats.

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